Roy Forester Family Tree Chart

To Enlarge: Click once. Then click again.
Roy Forester 5-Gen Tree

Arrows indicate lineages which go back further than the 5 generations shown.

Older generations are shown on the Family Tree Charts for each branch’s surname, which can be found from the Main Menu bar near the top of the screen. i.e. Bowser Tree Chart, Booher Tree Chart, etc.

Locations: Most of the locations you see under the people on this chart are Townships and Counties. Occasionally a town or city is shown. All locations are in Pennsylvania, except where otherwise indicated.

Roy Wilson Forester (1915) Obituary

Roy died on Feb 25, 1989 of cancer. He is buried at Lawn Haven Burial Estates in Worthington, Pa.

Obituary:
Leader-Times, Kittanning

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Roy “Pete” was nicknamed “One More Time” because he loved to go out to the VFW and dance on the weekends. He would dance every single dance (I remember him doing the same at family weddings), and when the band would announce that they were done for the night, he would holler out “one more time!”.

Most people knew my grandpap by the nickname Pete. They called him and his oldest son Roy “Pete and Re-Pete”.


Funeral Card94c0f-roy2bwilson2bfuneral2bcard

Roy and Katherine (Boyer) Forester Pictures

Roy and Katherine Wedding Day
Roy Wilson “Pete” Forester and Katherine Bertha Boyer on their wedding day.

 


 

1940. Roy and Katherine with William and Charles Boyer, nephews, sons of Austin V Boyer.
1940. Roy and Katherine with William and Charles Boyer, nephews, sons of Austin V Boyer.

 

1941 with son Roy
1941 Roy and Katherine with son Roy

 

1945 with children Roy, Kay and Tom
1945 Roy and Katherine with children Roy, Kay and Tom

 

Picnic
1955 Roy and Katherine at a picnic with son Rich. Click to enlarge.

 

1962. Roy and Katherine at son Roy's wedding.
1962. Roy and Katherine at son Roy’s wedding.

 

1965.Roy and Katherine's 25th Wedding Anniversary picnic with all 7 children.
1965.Roy and Katherine’s 25th Wedding Anniversary picnic with all 7 children.

 

April 10, 1966. Roy and Katherine just three weeks before Katherine passed from Leukemia. All children except Tom and Bill are present. Click to enlarge.
April 10, 1966. Roy and Katherine just three weeks before Katherine passed from Leukemia. All children except Tom and Bill are present. 4 grandchildren. Click to enlarge.

 

Same day. In this one, Katherine was able to manage a smile, probably a difficult thing considering that she'd been suffering with cancer for awhile.
Same day. In this one, Katherine was able to manage a smile, probably a difficult thing considering that she’d been suffering with cancer for awhile.

 

Roy and Katherine one week before her passing, on son Bill's birthday.
Roy and Katherine one week before her passing, on son Bill’s birthday.

 

 

George Farster (1774) Biography


George Farster (1774) Mini-Tree


The Story of George Farster Sr

George Farster is the ancestor of most of the Farsters in Armstrong County in the 1800s, including those in my branch who used the spelling “Forester” from the late 1800s and beyond.

In 1774, George was born in Wurtemberg, Germany. According to an old Armstrong County history book, George was an adult before he immigrated to the United States, employed in his native country as a school teacher. The identity of his parents is currently unknown.

In 1797, when George was 23, he was living in either Northampton or Berks County, Pa., where he married Katharina Yount (Yundt), 18, daughter of Daniel and Anna Maria (Hauer) Yundt of Berks and Northampton Counties, Pa.

In 1802, when George was 28, his first known child and son Adam was born in Northampton or Berks County.

In 1804, when George was 30, his second child and son Jonathan N was born, also in Eastern Pa.

In 1809, when George was 35, his third child and first daughter Barbara was born.

By 1810, George’s Yount in-laws had made the move to Kittanning Township in Armstrong County, but George is not on the same census. He has not yet been located on the 1810 census anywhere.

In 1811, when George was 37, his fourth child and third son Daniel was born.

In 1814, when he was 40, his fifth child and second daughter Rebecca was born.

In 1815, when he was 41, his sixth child and third daughter Sarah was born, in Philadelphia (Berks County) according to an old Armstrong County history book (source provided further below)

In 1818, when George was 44, his seventh child and fourth son George was born in Kittanning Township, Armstrong County.

In 1820, when he was 46, his eighth child and fifth son Phillip John was born

On the 1820 census, George, 46, a farmer, lived in Kittanning Township with his wife Katharina 41. All 8 of his children resided in the home, the oldest two, Adam 18, and Jonathan 16, were farmers with him. The household was listed on the census as follows:

  • 2 males under 10          [George Jr (2) & Philip John (0)]
  • 1 male 10-15                   [Daniel (9)]
  • 1 male 16-18                   [Jonathan N (16)]
  • 1 male 16-25                   [Adam (20)]
  • 1 male over 45                [George (46)]
  • 2 females under 10       [Rebecca (6) & Sarah (5)]
  • 1 female 16-25                [Barbara (although she was 15)]
  • 1 female 26-44               [Katharina (41)]

In 1824, when George was 50, his son Adam, 22, married Catherine Houser, 23, her parents unknown.

In 1827, when George was 53, his daughter Barbara, 18, married Christopher Schrecengost, 23, son of Conrad and Susanna (Zartman) Schrecengost of Kittanning Township. Conrad was also a German immigrant.

In 1829, when George was 55, he became a deacon in the German Reformed Church, where sermons were preached only in German.

On the 1830 census, George was 56, living in Kittanning Township with his wife Katharina 51. His children in the home were Jonathan 26, Daniel 19, Rebecca 16, Sarah 15, George 12, and Phillip John 10. His son Adam lived next door with his wife Catherine and infant son Daniel. His brother-in-law Daniel Yount lived nearby. Other neighbors included Housers, Hilemans, Shaffers, and Schrecengosts, all surnames of current and future daughters-in-law. George’s family was listed on the census as follows:

  • 1 male 5-9                     [Philip (10)]
  • 1 male 10-14                 [George Jr (12)]
  • 1 male 15-19                  [Daniel (19)]
  • 1 male 20-29                [Jonathan (26)]
  • 1 male 50-59                 [George (56)]
  • 1 female under 5          [Sarah? (15) wrong column]
  • 1 female 15-19               [Rebecca (16)]
  • 1 female 40-49             [Katharina (51)]

Somewhere around this time, George served as one of two early teachers in area one-room schoolhouses. One of these two earliest schools was situated near Garrett’s Run Road in Manor Township, the other in the Hileman settlement near Emmanual Church. The starting point or duration of George’s role occupation as schoolteacher is unknown, but it had to be some stretch of time between the years of 1820 and 1850.

In 1832, when George was 58, his son Jonathan, 27, married Mary Jane Hileman, 17, daughter of Solomon and Hannah (Yount) Hileman of Kittanning Township.

In 1833, when George was 59, his daughter Sarah, 18, married Joshua Pierce Boyd, 21, son of Isaac and Mary (Pierce) Boyd of Indiana County, Pa.

Also in 1833, after just one year of marriage, George’s son Jonathan was widowed.

In 1834, when George was 60, his wife Katharina died at age 55. Her funeral was held at Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church in Kittanning Township. This church was also referred to as “William’s” by Rev. Gabriel Adam Reichart in his writings.

In 1837, when George was 63, his son George, 19, married Mary Schreckengost, 15, daughter of Alexander and Susanna (King) Schrecengost.

Also in 1837, George’s son Jonathan, 33, remarried to Margaret Waltenbaugh, 23, daughter of Isaac and Polly Waltenbaugh of Kittanning Township.

In 1838, when George was 64, his youngest son Phillip, 18, married Christina “Fanny” Schreckengost, 18, another daughter of Alexander and Susanna (King) Schreckengost.

On the 1840 census, George, then 66, has not been found.

In 1845, when he was 71, his son Daniel, 33, married Sarah Warner, daughter of Jacob and Jane (Walker) Warner of Pine City, Armstrong, Pa.

In 1848, when he was 74, his daughter Barbara died at age 39, leaving 11 children behind, ranging in age from 1 to 18.

Om the 1850 census, George, 76, retired, lived in Kittanning Township in the home of his son Adam, 48, and his daughter-in-law Catherine, 49. Grandchildren living in the home were: Daniel 20, Isaac 12, Catherine 11, Finley 9, and Sarah 7. Adam owned the home worth $1100.

Sometime in 1850 George died at age 76. He is buried at Rupp’s Lutheran Church Cemetery off Route 422 in Kittanning Township. There is no grave marker.


 Excerpts from History Books

Occupation

Source: Armstrong County, PA: Her People, Past & Present, J. H. Beers & Co., 1914, page 763:

“…Sarah Forrester, who was born in Philadelphia, daughter of George Forrester, a native of Germany who taught school in his native land and also after coming to America.”

Source: History of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania by Robert Walker Smith Esq., Chicago, Walkins & Co., 1885, chapter 7, pages 179-185

(about Kittanning Township under the section “History of Armstrong County”. This book can be found on-line at pa-roots.com~armstrong)

“The facts relative to schools which existed before the adoption of the common school system, which the writer has been able to collect, are meager. There was, as he is informed, one of those early schools in a log schoolhouse situated about fifty rods south of Garrett’s Run and about a mile and fifty or sixty rods east of the Manor Twp line, and another about a mile and a half southwest of the former and two hundred rods east of the above mentioned line, in the Hileman settlement, or about a hundred rods south of Emmanuel Church. The names of the early teachers met with are those of George Farster and George Leighley.”

Religion

Source: Armstrong County, Her People, Past and Present, J. H. Beers & Co., 1914, page 214

(Section on churches)

“Christ’s, also known as Rupp’s, was the first church organized in [Kittanning] township. It was located four miles east of Kittanning borough and one fourth of a mile north of the Indiana pike. The early records were destroyed in the fire which consumed the home of Francis Rupp in the eighties, so tradition is the only resource for a history of the church. It was probably organized in 1811 by Rev. Mr. Lampbrecht, a Lutheran clergyman, who dedicated the log edifice the next year . . . Rev. Gabriel A. Reichert was pastor of this church from 1826 to 1830. Conrad Schrecongost and George Wilt were elders and George Farster and John Cravenor, deacons. Preaching in English began here in 1850, when Rev. Mr. Bernheim was pastor. The congregation was incorporated in 1853 as tne Evangelical Lutheran Church of Christ . . . “

(section on “Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church, Kittanning Township, Armstrong County” on a forgotten genealogy website)

“The next pastor was Rev. Gabriel Adam Reichart , a thorough German, a true Lutheran and a man of God. His private diary indicates that he became a pastor of congregation, October 14, 1825. For some time previous to this, he was pastor of neighboring churches, and able to preach occasionally at Rupp’s. From October 14, 1825, to December 25, 1837, he served them regularly every four weeks, preaching in German, except for a little English sermon during the last four years of his pastorate. In his private diary he always refers to this church as “Williams”, probably because he sometimes preached at the home of George Williams Sr.”

“In 1830 Konrad Schrecongost and George Wild were the elders, and George Forster and John Krevener the deacons.”

“From 1829 to 1934, he administered the sacraments of the altar to the following persons in this church: ‘. . . among those listed that took communion are: George Forster, Katharina Forster, Adam Forster, Daniel Forster. (Note: Christ Evangelical later became known as Rupp’s)'”


 Go to:

George Farster Sr’s Profile Page


Amos Levi Forester (1868) Biography


 Amos Levi Forester (1868) Mini-Tree


Levi Forester Profile PicThe Story of Amos “Levi” Forester

In 1868, on October 8th, Levi was born the youngest child of his father George Farster, a farmer age 50, and Elizabeth Jane Shaffer, age 36, in Wayne Township. Levi’s mom was his dad’s 2nd wife, the mother of the youngest 4 of his dad’s 10 children. Levi’s 4 oldest siblings, who were not living at home, were: Absalom J Farster, 27; Archibald B, would be 23, (died in the Civil War); Lavina, 21 (probably married); Nancy, 19 (pregnant, living next door with 1st cousin/husband Henry Farster). Levi’s 5 siblings who were living in the parents home were; Adaline, 17; George Jr, 15; Mary J, 10; Rebecca A, 6; and Addison W, 3. Levi’s dad was a farmer.

On the 1870 census, Levi’s family was living in Wayne Township, Armstrong County. Levi was 2 years old, the youngest of 5 children in the household of his dad George 52, and mother Elizabeth 36. Siblings in the house were George 16, Mary J 12, Rebecca 7, and Addison 5.  Levi’s dad continued to farm and had property worth $1800 in addition to other assets worth $700. Sisters Mary J and Rebecca were attending school. Levi and Addison were too young for school. Older sister Nancy lived next door, married to her 1st cousin Henry Farster (son of uncle Philip Farster) with their 2-yr-old daughter Jane. Henry was also a farmer.

In 1879, when Levi was 11, his oldest sibling and brother Absalom, 38, married Elizabeth Kennedy, 29, daughter of James and Lavina (Thomas) Kennedy of Jefferson County, Pa.

On the 1880 census, the family home was in Sugarcreek Township in Armstrong County, Pa. Levi was 12 years old, living with his parents George 62, and Elizabeth 47. His siblings still at home were Rebecca 18, and Adison 15. Levi’s dad was still farming. Sister Rebecca could read but not write. Levi and Adison attended school. Living next door was Levi’s grandpap Peter Shaffer, 87, a widowed farmer, along with aunt Mary Shaffer, age 45 and single, and his aunt Rebecca Shaffer-Davis, age 32 and widowed. The Forester household may have moved over to Sugarcreek Township for the purpose of being close to the Shaffer in-laws. This new location was much closer to the home of Elizabeth Bowser, Levi’s future wife.

In 1883, when Levi was 15, his sister Rebecca, 21, married William Smith, age and parents unknown.

On June 6, 1892, Levi, 24, married Elizabeth Isabell Bowser, 19, daughter of Jonathan and Lucinda (Booher) Bowser. Levi was a farmer at the time of their marriage. Elizabeth went by the name Lizzie. They were married in Worthington, Pa. by F. Beck, Justice of the Peace.

In 1892, when Levi was 24, his first child and daughter, Effie May, was born. She died in the same year. Whether she lived days, weeks or months is unknown.

In 1893, when he was 25, his second child and daughter, Sara Bertha, was born.

In 1894, when he was 26, his third child and first son, Addison Jessie, was born.

In 1895, when Levi was 27, his son Addison Jessie died.

In 1896, when he was 28, his fourth child and second son, Charles Raymond, was born.

In 1898, when he was 30, his fifth child and third daughter, Clara Mabel, was born.

In 1899, when he was 31, his sixth child and fourth daughter, Vernie Blanche, was born.

On the 1900 census, Levi 32, and Lizzie 26, were living in a rented home in Rayburn Township, a rural area outside of the town of Kittanning in Armstrong County. Children living in the home were Bertha S 6; Charlie 3; Clara 2; and Vernie B, 9 mo. Since this census was taken in June, Lizzie was 3-4 months pregnant with their next child (Archie). At this point the couple had been married for 7 years. Lizzie had given birth to 6 children, 4 of whom survived. Levi worked as a day laborer. It was reported that he and Lizzie could read and write in English. None of the children were attending school.

In November of 1900, when he was 32, Levi’s seventh child and third son, Archie Lee, was born.

In 1902, when he was 34, his eighth child and fifth daughter, Lucinda Jane, was born.

In 1903, when he was 35, his ninth child and sixth daughter, Eva Mahalia, was born.

In 1905, when he was 37, his tenth child and seventh daughter, Frances Melvia, was born.

In 1907, when he was 39, his eleventh child and fourth son, William Calvin, was born.

In 1908, when he was 40, his twelfth child and fifth son, Herbert Earl was born.

In 1910, Levi, age 42, and his wife Liza 36 were living in a rented home in Manor Township, a township encompassing a small part of the town of Kittanning and all of the neighboring town of Ford City. Since no house number is listed on the census, the family home must have been in the rural area between the two towns. The children in the house were Bertha 16, Charlie 15, Clara 13, Blanche 12, Archie 11, Jane 9, Eva 7, Frances 5, Willie 3, and Herbert 1 yr 4mo. Lizzie was reported to be the mother of 12 children, with 10 still living. Levi was working as a laborer in a brickyard. He was said to be able to read, not write. Son Charlie was no longer attending school, but all the rest of them, except the 3 youngest, were. They live in a location with many Austrian neighbors. Since Levi (and Probably Lizzie) spoke German, they were probably able to communicate well with them.

4 months later in 1910, on Aug 20th, Levi’s son Herbert died at 1 year and 8 months of age in Manor Township where he was also buried. His death certificate records the cause of death as “membranous croup,” a condition suffered for 3 or 4 days. This was another way of saying diphtheria, a contagious disease of the throat.

In 1911, when he was 43, Levi’s thirteenth child and eighth daughter, Dorothy Gwendolyn, was born.

In 1912 a Kittanning area directory called the “Painter Town Directory” listed Levi as a laborer, married to Elizabeth.

In 1913, when he was 45, Levi’s fourteenth child and sixth son, Edward Ford, was born. Also in this year, Levi’s oldest brother Absalom J Farster, age 72, died in Wayne Township.

In 1914, when Levi was 46, his daughter Bertha, 21, married Argy Ellworth Wolfe, 21, son of Guy and Ella (Bowser) Wolfe. Early the following year, Levi’s first grandchild was born, Elery Charles Wolfe. Both of Argy’s maternal grandparents were Bowsers.

In early 1915, when Levi was 47, his daughter Clara, 17, married Charles Troutner, 23, son of Thomas and Anna (Waugaman) Troutner of Worthington.

In December of the same year, Levi’s son Charles “Chuck”, 19,  married Eva Julia Lewis, 19, daughter of Addison and Catherine (Morrow) Lewis.

In 1915, when he was 47, his fifteenth child and seventh son, Roy Wilson, was born. Roy was born very tiny, about 3 pounds. He was born at home, where his family cared for him. They kept the fire in the wood stove burning constantly, with him lying near it, to keep him warm enough to have a chance at surviving. Their efforts were successful.

In 1918, when Levi was 50, his sister Nancy Farster, 69, died in Echo, Wayne Township.

In 1919 or 1920, when Levi was 51 or 52, his daughter Lucinda Jane “Lucy”, 17 or 18, married Robert James Early, 24 or 25, son of George and Elizabeth Early of Butler, Pa.

On the 1920 census, Levi, 52 was living in a rented home in West Franklin Township in Armstrong County not far from Worthington, with his wife Elizabeth 46, and children: Blanche 20, Archie 19, Eva 17, Melvia 15, William 13, Dorothy 9, Edward 6, and Roy 4. Levi was once again working as a farmer near the area where he and Lizzie had lived before they were married. Levi’s oldest 3 daughters, Blanche, Eva and Melvia (Frances), were working as weavers in a woolen mill. Archie was a coal miner. William and Dorothy attended school. Edward (Ford) and Roy were too young for school. It is reported that Lizzie is unable to read or write in English. The family’s neighbors are primarily German and Austrian.
Levi’s children Blanche, Archie, Eva, Melvia and Dorothy were also listed on the census in the home of their older sister Clara Forester-Troutner on Race Street in the nearby town of Worthington.

In 1921, when Levi was 53, his daughter Eva Mahalia, 18, married Harry Orin Claypoole, 21, son of Orin and Dollie Claypoole of Worthington.

In 1922, when Levi was 54, his son Archie, 22, married Eliza “Lyda” Somerville, 21, daughter of William and Mary (James) Somerville of West Franklin Township.

In 1923, when Levi was 55, his daughter Frances Melvia, 18, married Russell L Craig, 21, son of William and Mary Gertrude (Young) Craig of Worthington.

In 1928, when Levi was 60, his daughter Vernie “Blanche”, 28, married Richard C Reining, 24, son of Charles and Lacy Reining of Allegheny County, Pa. The couple moved to Detroit, Michigan.

In 1929, when Levi was 61, his daughter Frances Melvia Forester-Craig died, 24, from typhoid fever and bronchial pneumonia. She left a husband and 4 small children behind, the children ranging in age from 3 weeks old to 5 years old. The children were split up into the homes of close relatives: Isabelle Gertrude, 5, to Eva and Harry Claypoole; Leroy, 3, to Charles and Eva Forester; Shirley May, 2, to grandparents William and Mary Craig; and James, 3 weeks, to Charles and Clara Troutner.

In 1930, Levi, 62, was not shown on the census. This may have been a mistake. Lizzie was listed as head of household and married. They rented a home for $5/month on Race Street in Worthington. Ford 17, and Roy 15, were living in the home. Lizzie’s marriage age was reported as 19. She was unable to read or write in English, but the boys could. Ford worked as a helper in a woolen mill, and Roy attended school. Levi and Lizzie’s son Archie, 29, lived next door with his wife Eliza 27, and their children Edwin L 4, Joseph W 1, and cousin, Vernie Earley 13 (Lucinda’s daughter). Archie was a miller in a grist mill.

It was about 1930 that Levi retired from working.

In 1931, when Levi was 63, his wife “Liza”, 57, died in the home of their daughter Eva Claypoole after suffering for some time with stomach cancer. After his wife’s death, Levi stays in the homes of his married daughters, rotating between them about every 2-3 months.

On March 10, 1936, when Levi was 67, he died of liver cancer. Levi’s son Roy, who was 20 at the time, later told the story that Levi, on the day of his death, said that he was going to lay down and die. He then laid down in bed and never got back up. Levi is buried in the Worthington Presbyterian Cemetery in Worthington, Pa.


Personal Stories:

According to Lucinda Forester’s daughter Florence, it was said that Levi and his family moved a great deal. They were always very poor. In his occupation as farmer, Levi moved from farm to farm, either living on or near the farm where he was paid by the owner to work the land. The work at each farm didn’t tend to last very long, so the family would move on to the next place where work was available. Levi worked primarily around the Worthington area, where many of his children married and settled.

Also according to Levi’s granddaughter Florence, she was 16 years old when he died. One of her memories is that he spoke Dutch, and would frequently, randomly count to 10 in Dutch.


Go To:

Amos Levi Forester’s Profile Page

George Farster (1818) Biography


George Farster (1818) Mini-Tree


The Story of George Farster Jr.

In 1818, George Farster Jr was born the seventh of eight known children of German immigrant George Farster Sr, 44, and his wife Katharina Yount, 39. His older siblings living in the home were: Adam 16, Jonathan 14, Barbara 9, Daniel 7, Rebecca 4, and Sarah 3. The family had recently moved to Armstrong County, Pa. and were residing in Kittanning Township. The family spoke German and attended church services conducted in German. George Sr was a farmer now, but he used to be a schoolteacher in Germany. If he was not yet teaching school in Armstrong County, he soon would be, as the history books tell us, he was one of the first two teachers in the area’s one-room schoolhouses. George Sr and his wife Katharina Yount had been married for 21 years when George Jr was born.

In January of 1820, when George Jr was 2, his brother Phillip John was born.

On the 1820 census, George Jr, 2, lived in Kittanning Township with his parents, George Sr 46, a farmer, and Katharina 41. All 7 of his siblings were residing in the home, the oldest two, Adam 18, and Jonathan 16, were farmers with their father. George Sr’s household was listed on the census as follows:

  • 2 males under 10          [George Jr (2) & Philip John (0)]
  • 1 male 10-15                   [Daniel (9)]
  • 1 male 16-18                   [Jonathan N (16)]
  • 1 male 16-25                   [Adam (20)]
  • 1 male over 45                [George (46)]
  • 2 females under 10       [Rebecca (6) & Sarah (5)]
  • 1 female 16-25                [Barbara (although she was 15)]
  • 1 female 26-44               [Katharina (41)]

In 1824, when George was 6, his oldest brother Adam, 22, married Catherine Houser, 23, her parents unknown.

In 1827, when George was 9, his sister Barbara, 18, married Christopher Schrecengost, 23, son of Conrad and Susanna (Zartman) Schrecengost of Kittanning Township. Conrad was a German immigrant.

In 1829, when George was 11, his dad became a deacon in the German Reformed Church, the family’s church where sermons were preached only in German.

On the 1830 census, George was 12, living with his parents, George Sr 56, and Katharina 51. Siblings in the home were Jonathan 26, Daniel 19, Rebecca 16, Sarah 15, and Phillip John 10. His brother Adam was living next door with wife Catherine and infant son Daniel. George’s uncle Daniel Yount lived nearby. George’s family was listed on the census as follows:

  • 1 male 5-9                     [Philip (10)]
  • 1 male 10-14                 [George Jr (12)]
  • 1 male 15-19                  [Daniel (19)]
  • 1 male 20-29                [Jonathan (26)]
  • 1 male 50-59                 [George (56)]
  • 1 female under 5          [Sarah? (15) wrong column]
  • 1 female 15-19               [Rebecca (16)]
  • 1 female 40-49             [Katharina (51)]

In 1832, when George was 14, his brother Jonathan, 27, married Mary Jane Hileman, 17, daughter of Solomon and Hannah (Yount) Hileman of Kittanning Township.

In 1833, when George was 15, his sister Sarah, 18, married Joshua Pierce Boyd, 21, son of Isaac and Mary (Pierce) Boyd of Indiana County, Pa.

Also in 1833, after just one year of marriage, George’s brother Jonathan was widowed.

In 1834, when George was 16, his mother Katharina died. Her funeral was at Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church in Kittanning Township. This church was also referred to as “William’s” by Rev. Gabriel Adam Reichart.

In 1837, when George was 19, he married Mary Schreckengost, age 15, daughter of Alexander and Susanna (King) Schrecengost.

Also in 1837, George’s brother Jonathan, 33, remarried to Margaret Waltenbaugh, 23, daughter of Isaac and Polly Waltenbaugh of Kittanning Township.

In 1838, when George was 20, his brother Phillip married Christina “Fanny” Schreckengost, the sister of George’s own wife Mary.

On the 1840 census, George was 22, living with his wife Mary, 18. His last name on the census was “Farst.” There were no children yet. George and Mary were both listed in the age group “20-30 years old.” Brother Philip and sister-in-law Christina were living next to him, with their 1 yr-old son Joshua. The 2 brothers were working as farmers, living next door to their father-in-law Alexander Schreckengost, in Pine Township, Armstrong County. The Schreckengosts and the Farsters had both resided in Kittanning Township on the 1820 and 1830 censuses.

In 1841, when George was 23, his first child and son Absalom J was born.

In 1845, when he was 27, his second child and son Archibald B was born.

In 1847, when he was 29, his third child and first daughter Lavina was born.

In 1849, his fourth child and second daughter Nancy was born.

On the 1850 census, George, 32, was a farmer living in Cowanshannock Township with his wife Mary, 28, and children: Absalom 8, Archibald 5, Lavina 3, and Nancy 11 mo. George’s wife Mary was unable to read and write in English. Absalom attended school.

In 1851, when George was 33, his fifth child and third daughter Adaline was born.

In 1853, when he was 35, his sixth child and third son George was born.

In 1855, when he was 37, George was widowed when his wife Mary died at the age of 33.

In 1857, when he was 39, George married Elizabeth “Betsy” Shaffer, 24, daughter of Peter and Mary (Ripple) Shaffer of Cowanshannock Township.

In 1858, when he was 40, George’s seventh child and fourth daughter Mary J was born, the first child with his 2nd wife Betsy.

On the 1860 census, George 42, a farmer, lived in Wayne Township with his wife Betsy, 27, and his children: Absalom 18, Archibald 14, Lavina 12, Nancy 10, Adaline 8, George 6, and Mary J 2. George owned his property worth $1000, with personal assets worth $100. His son Absalom was a farmer, while Archibald, Lavina, Nancy and Adaline attended school. The nearest post office was Scrubgrass. The family’s name was listed as “Farst” on this census report.

In 1862, when he was 44, George’s eighth child and fifth daughter Rebecca A was born.

By 1864, when George was 46, his sons Absalom and Archie both entered the Civil War in the 14th Regiment, Pennsylvania Cavalry, 159th Volunteers, both serving as Privates in Company M.

On November 23, 1864, George’s son Archie died in the Civil War at Sandy Hook in Washington County, Maryland. He is buried at Antietam National Battlefield Site in Sharpsburg, Maryland, site 4011.

In 1865, when he was 47, George’s ninth child and fourth son Addison W was born.

In 1867, when he was 49, George’s daughter Nancy, 17, married Henry Farster, 22, son of Phillip and Christina (Schreckengost) Farster. Nancy and Henry were 1st cousins in two ways. 1) Their dads, George and Phillip, were brothers. 2) Their mothers, Mary and Christina Schreckengost, were sisters. Nancy and Henry descended from identical bloodlines. Henry Farster had served in the Civil War, but in a different Regiment than Absalom and Archie.

In 1868, when he was 50, George’s tenth child and fifth son Amos Levi was born.

On the 1870 census, George 52, a farmer, lived in Wayne Township with his wife Betsy 37, and his 5 youngest children: George 17, Mary J 12, Rebecca 8, Addison 5, and Levi 2. George owned his real estate valued at $1800, with a personal estate worth $700. Mary J and Rebecca are attended school. George’s daughter Nancy, 21, lived next door with her husband Henry, 26, and their daughter Jane, 2. Henry was also a farmer, who owned his property valued at $750, and a personal estate of $250. Neither Henry nor Nancy could read or write in English.

On the 1880 census, George, 62, a farmer, lived in Sugarcreek Township with his wife Betsy, 47, and children: Rebecca 18, Addison 15, and Levi 12. Rebecca was reported to be unable to write in English. The two boys attended school. Living next door was George’s father-in-law Peter Shaffer, 87, widowed, a farmer, with 2 daughters: Mary Shaffer, 45 and single, and Rebecca Davis, 32 and widowed. Other neighbors included many Bowser families, relatives of son Levi’s future wife Elizabeth Bowser.

In 1883, when George was 65, his daughter Rebecca, 21, married William Smith, 23.

On November 2, 1887, George died at the age of 69. The cause of death is unknown, as well as the location of his grave.

George’s wife Betsy may or may not have survived him. The date of her death is unknown.


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